Choosing Keywords : Find Keywords that will Generate Traffic

In the world of internet marketing, there is nothing better than free website traffic. Free website traffic means more sales, and more sales means more revenue. Choosing the right keywords is the best way to generate website traffic. There are many opinions on choosing good keywords, but it’s crucial to learn the basics first.

WHAT IS A KEYWORD?

A keyword is just a technical way of saying search term. When you go to Google and type in “learn internet marketing” that’s a keyword phrase. People in internet marketing call them keywords because that’s what Google calls them, and who is going to argue with Google?

WHY ARE KEYWORDS IMPORTANT?

Keywords are important for two reasons. First, keywords are important because that’s how people find things on the internet. If I want to buy “internet marketing tools,” I go to Google and type in something like “best internet marketing tools.” When the search results come back, I click through the links and find the website that looks the best to me, and maybe I buy a tool. Keywords are how people find products or information that they want on the internet.

Second, keywords are important because search engines rank, or organize, web pages based on relevant keywords. Google wants to provide good, helpful, relevant results for users. They do this through the use of keywords. When Google robots crawl websites, they look for the keywords used on your web pages and they look at keywords used by other websites to link to your web pages (i.e., backlinks).

So, keywords connect users and providers in many different ways, with Google’s help, of course. In most cases, keywords connect buyers and sellers. If I create a website that sells internet marketing tools, then I need to use the proper keywords so people can find me. If I don’t use keywords in all of my online activities, I will significantly decrease my odds of showing up on Google’s first page of search results.

For example, let’s say I have a website that sells a pizza recipe book, and the title of the website is “Tony From The Bronx.” Everyone links to my website using Tony, or Tony From The Bronx, or Tony’s Website. That’s not a good use of keywords because Google will have no way to know that your website is about a pizza recipe book unless you tell them through the use of proper keywords. As a result, it will be much harder to get on Google’s first page of search results because you failed to identify, and use, the right keywords on your website.

THE BEST KEYWORDS

It’s easy to identify which keywords are relevant to your website because Google shares that information with anyone who wants it through the Google Keyword Tool. Among other things, the Google Keyword Tool provides users with keywords, Cost per Click estimates, and traffic estimates.

In addition to finding keywords that are relevant, you need to find keywords that are not extremely competitive. To determine how competitive a keyword is, you need to perform keyword research. Luckily, there are very good tools available to help with your keyword research, both free and paid tools. Ultimately, you want to get a good idea of how difficult it would be to get to the top of Google search results.

The competitiveness of a keyword phrase is very important. It can determine whether it will take you two years to get to the top of Google search results or two weeks to get to the top of Google search results. If you choose poorly, you might be setting yourself up for disappointment.

For example, let’s say you want to start a mortgage company. You build your website and start targeting the term “mortgages.” Unbeknownst to you, there are many companies, with large SEO budgets, competing for that term. They have spent a lot of time, labor and money building the strength of their website so that their website will show up on Google’s first page when someone types in “mortgages.” It would take one individual a long time and a lot of work to outrank those established websites.

On the other hand, you can choose a keyword term that appears to have very little competition, such as “home lending mortgage.” After some moderate work, you might make it to Google’s first page. But, that’s when you realize that only 110 people, worldwide, type in “home lending mortgage” when they search for a home loan. You might get a percentage of that traffic, but it’s certainly not profitable. Even if you rank number one for a phrase, that doesn’t guarantee that it will be profitable.

Of course, the best keyword is one that has low competition and plenty of traffic to make it profitable. In some markets, it can be difficult to find keywords that satisfy those requirements, but they do exist. If you own a main street business and want to market your business online in a competitive market, then you should be prepared for a long, hard road, but it is still very possible to get on Google’s first page.

KEYWORD RESEARCH

Keywords should be researched before you even buy your domain name. Keywords should be used in everything you do, whether that is creating a backlink, or writing a blog post. You need to use keywords properly so you can rank well in the search results. Regardless of how good your website might be, people need to find your website, so you can generate traffic and make sales.

Finding your keywords is the first step of many, but it’s very important to make sure you do it properly so you don’t set yourself up to fail from the very beginning. With hard work, you might be able to rank well for any search term, but you should know what you’re getting into, before you begin.

 

Google Pagerank, SEO, Traffic and Your Website

I noticed that the Pagerank for Superbad Internet Marketing was recently increased from PR0 to PR1 in the last few days, so I wanted to discuss a few concepts when it comes to Pagerank (PR).

Most people in the world of internet marketing know that PR is a number from 0 to 10 assigned by Google. Some people obsess over the PR of their website and do everything they can to increase it (through SEO).

Google claims that it’s not very important, it’s just an indicator for internal ranking purposes (or something like that). I’m not gonna get into what PR is and all of that, but I do want to take a look at a few specific examples.

If you don’t know how to find the PR for any given website, you can install the Google Toolbar or the SEO Toolbar from SEO Book.  They’re both free.  After you get it installed, the little green bar indicates the PR when you hover your mouse over it.

Pagerank is not an indication of the quality of the website. For example, Harsh Agrawal, a blogger at ShoutMeLoud ran a little experiment.  He set up a WordPress website with no content, other than the title tag and the navigation menu.  He wanted to see if he could increase PR just through commenting on blogs.  It worked.  The blog, with no content, was increased to PR 3 within 7 months, just based on backlinks from comments.

Since the most recent Google PR update (January 2011), his experimental website has decreased from PR3 to PR1, but the case study is still very useful.  I believe he is going to develop the website into something soon, but if you want to see the website he used for the experiment.

Pagerank is not an indication of traffic.  The website in the experiment above had less than 50 visitors per month, so it certainly wasn’t an indication of traffic.  You might think that PR is an indication of number of backlinks.  Well, let’s take a look at another website.

First, let me just say that I don’t know the person associated with this website and I have no connection with them in anyway.  I came across this example in a forum and it kind of surprised me at the time.  This website is a PR3 and it has only 3 incoming links.

One link is from the forum referring to it, so it was a PR 3 before that.  Another link seems to be broken.  The other link is from a PR4 website.  I’m going to link to it here, so that will make it 4 links to the website.

There’s nothing special about that website.  It has 5 very short pages and that’s it.  I don’t imagine it gets very much traffic, if any.  It’s more of a general website for an accounting business in Australia.  One link from a PR4 website brought it up to a PR3.

So, what’s my point?

My point is focus on metrics that are important.  PR is not an indication of traffic, it’s not an indication of number of backlinks, and it’s certainly not an indication of revenue, which is important if you’re running a website to make money.  Spend time on things that you can control and let Google do what they want with their PR system.